Politics

MCA man accuses DAP of sidelining non-Muslims

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Zaidi Azmi
Written by Zaidi Azmi

KUALA LUMPUR – April 10, 2017: A Penang MCA man has accused the DAP of sidelining non-Muslims in Penang and Selangor, the latter somewhat questionable because the state is led by PKR.

In justifying his claim today, the state’s MCA secretary Tang Heap Seng pointed out to the Penang government’s religious fund distribution as being unequal between Muslims and non-Muslims there.

“Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng and the DAP have allocated RM450 million for Islamic affairs in eight years while that for other religious affairs amounted to lower than RM8 million,” wrote Tang in a statement.

The same preferential treatment, alleged Tang, had also happened in the PKR-led Selangor government.

He stated that despite the DAP having the most number of seats in Selangor, the party has failed to prevent the state government from implementing supposedly lopsided policies.

Such policies include the banning of licensed betting, gender segregation at cinemas, cancelling concerts, compelling the Octoberfest to be celebrated at a parking lot and removing a local pork cuisine from the Visit Klang Year 2017 brochure.

Tang, however, deemed that the pinnacle of the supposed unfairness was the Selangor government’s latest guideline for the construction of places of worship for non-Muslims.

According to the guideline, a non-Muslim place of worship should not be built within 50 metres of a home owned by a Muslim.

And if the place is in  a multi-racial area, all residents within a 200-metre radius must consent to it before it can be built.

Hence Tang thinks that Lim had made the biggest political joke in the country when he claimed two weeks ago that the Selangor DAP had since its fallout with PAS two years ago decided to stay on in the Selangor government to prevent the Islamist party from doing whatever it wanted to do.

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About the author

Zaidi Azmi

Zaidi Azmi

Despite becoming The MOLE's journalist in 2014, he still has a hard time traversing the city. If he is not lost, this northern kampung boy can be found struggling to make some sense out of the Malaysian political sphere.