Politics

Many see today as Muhyiddin’s D-day

muhyiddin 10

Nikita Nawawi
Written by Nikita Nawawi

KUALA LUMPUR – Sept 8, 2015: The Umno supreme council meeting later today has been perceived by many as a battlefield for Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin to save his political career.

The meeting will be the first since the Cabinet reshuffle on July 28 where the Umno deputy president was removed from his deputy prime minister and education minister posts.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, who is the Umno president had explained that Muhyiddin and several others were removed from the Cabinet because he needed those who can work with him as a team in the government.

Muhyiddin had openly questioned Najib’s handling of issues surrounding the controversial state-own investment company 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB).

His position as the party’s No. 2 has since been the subject of speculation with many expecting him to be removed from it.

The speculation of Muhyiddin’s sacking at today’s meeting had however been denied by several party leaders including vice-president Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein, Youth chief Khairy Jamaluddin and Wanita chief Datuk Seri Shahrizat Abdul Jalil.

Nonetheless, it did not end the speculation as netizens continue to discuss Muhyiddin’s fate.

Blogger Zakhir Mohammed, better known as Big Dog in a  blog posting opined that Umno cannot afford to oust any of its top leaders especially after the sacking of former deputy president Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim in 1998.

“Unless it is glaring that these leaders cooperated with opposition leaders openly against the party especially during an election campaign, then there would not be any solid excuse to initiate an expulsion exercise.

“Umno is unable to face the repercussion for another episode of sacking supreme council level leaders, regardless what are the mitigating circumstances and evidence presented,” he wrote.

Anonymous blogger of Life of Annie however was of a different opinion as she felt that Najib will get rid of his deputy to ensure the party’s smooth sailing.

“Logically, Najib should remove Muhyiddin and replace him with someone else as his deputy. I cannot see how they can work together now.

“It would be too difficult for Najib to have Muhyiddin, who openly questions his decisions as prime minister and Umno president to continue being his right hand man over the next two and a half years before the next general election,” she wrote on her blog.

Annie expects Najib to experience more problems if Muhyiddin stays in the party leadership, especially when the latter continues to openly express his disagreement towards the prime minister’s administration.

“I do not think Muhyiddin would shut up if he is allowed to remain as Umno deputy president. Discontent within Umno will continue if this happen,” she added.

Meanwhile, social media users are also weighing the pros and cons of Muhyiddin’s possible dismissal today.

Hari Hari Mau: “It is a hard decision whether to sack Muhyiddin or not. Sacking of the deputy president may bring more ‘trouble’ in the party but if not, it could become a ‘cancer’ inside the party.”

Fadli Shah: “If Muhyiddin is ousted from one of the top posts in Umno, it could lead to the downfall of this party (Umno) in the country and most importantly in the upcoming general election.”

Kevin Ed Mclean: “Muhyiddin has contributed to Umno for almost 40 years. He should stay.”

Raymond Siew: “Najib would not take the risk to sack any (Umno) parliamentarian at the moment. He worries that the sacked parliamentarian would agree to no confidence vote against him.”

Real Afral: “Muhyiddin has not been taking actions to guarantee his position in Umno. He could have gathered Umno leaders who are known to be ‘against’ Najib to be on his side. His silence and inaction will not help him against his former boss in the Cabinet.”

Comments

comments

About the author

Nikita Nawawi

Nikita Nawawi

Nikita Nawawi is an up-and-coming writer who started his involvement in the media industry serving established local English daily, before joining The Mole in October 2014 as journalist.