Politics

Analysts give special task force a thumbs up

Jib Dek

Zaidi Azmi
Written by Zaidi Azmi

KUALA LUMPUR – July 10, 2015: Political analysts believed that the special task force assigned to probe the embattled 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) has so far been doing a good job.

They also advise the public to wait for the task force to complete their investigations and for now refrain from making any assumptions over the allegations against 1MDB or even possibly discussing them.

Dr Jeniri Amir of Universiti Malaysia Sarawak reckoned that so far the task force has been performing their investigations well within its designated terms of reference.

“I think they have realized how enormous the trust and responsibilities that they are shouldering to determine the future of the country.

“Coupled with the fact that this case has become internationally known, I do not believe that they (the task force) would dare to try anything funny,” he said.

He told The Mole that there would be serious implications to the country’s reputation if the task force were to hide any information pertaining to the investigation.

“Right now, some segment of the public has already developed negative perceptions towards them (the task force).

“The argument often floated by the public is that, those spearheading the task force could be bias in their probe as they are all appointed by the Prime Minister himself,” said Jeniri.

He said in order to handle such negative perceptions, it is imperative for the task force to publicise the complete report of their investigation regarding the veracity of the accusation hurled against 1MDB.

Agreeing with Jeniri over the task force’s performance was another political analyst Prof Abdul Halim Sidek from the National Council of Professors.

He, however, claimed that certain segments of the public were behaving unfairly in regards to the probe launched against the government owned strategic investment firm.

“It is unlawful for them (the public) to discuss and speculate about the allegations against 1MDB. The investigations were still ongoing nd therefore it is sub-judice for now to turn the matter into a public discussion.

“I have read many negative assumptions in the internet and social media, where some members of the public had even judged Najib as guilty despite the case being still investigated.

“How can the public make decisions based on half-truths or partially completed information? Just wait until the complete report comes out then only will the case be open for public interpretation,” said Abdul Halim.

Abdul Halim claimed that the “unbecoming behaviour” of deeming an accused being guilty until proven innocent was due to them adhering to a certain trend created by Najib’s enemies.

“I believed that the distrust against Najib that has become rampant amongst the public is set up by those who are on the payroll of Najib’s enemies,” he claimed.

However, unlike Abdul Halim, Jeniri was of the opinion that it was Najib’s inability to effectively counter the allegations made against him is what had made the level of public distrust against him rose even higher.

The special task force led by Auditor-General Tan Sri Abdul Ghani Patail, Bank Negara Governor Tan Sri Zeti Akhtar Aziz, Inspector General of Police Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Abu Bakar and Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission chief commissioner Tan Sri Abu Kassim Mohamed was formed on March.

It was instructed by Najib to probe 1MDB to determine the authenticity of the accusation made by the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

Last week, WSJ accuses 1MDB of channeling RM2.6 billion into Najib’s private bank accounts and this had caused the task force to conduct a search to secure various documents at the 1MDB headquarters in Jalan Sultan Ismail two days ago.

The task force had so far been updating the public with every new findings from its investigation.

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About the author

Zaidi Azmi

Zaidi Azmi

Despite becoming The MOLE's journalist in 2014, he still has a hard time traversing the city. If he is not lost, this northern kampung boy can be found struggling to make some sense out of the Malaysian political sphere.